It is interesting to see how Peranakan restaurants in Singapore have evolved over the last few years.

On one end of the spectrum, there are traditional and family-oriented ones (some can be slightly on the pricey side); while there are others which are modern and casual.

I would say Godmama somehow managed to strike a balance between the two. It was also voted ”Best New Restaurant of the Year In Singapore” last year by Chope.

Godmama is a modern Peranakan restaurant delivering both authentic Nyonya cuisine and innovative Peranakan food creations.

Co-owner Christina Keilthy left her corporate job to join the F&B industry, because she wanted to preserve the delicious legacy of her Godma’s and Ma’s Egg Skin Popiah, a dish she had the fortune of enjoying since childhood.

Godmama’s extensive menu of Peranakan heirloom recipes, cocktails and mod-Peranakan brunch offerings aims to make the cuisine approachable and accessible to the masses.

The food is served in a contemporary setting with indoor and al fresco dining options.

It is located next to Wildrice Theatre at Funan, so sometimes you may spot your favourite drama actors and actresses dining or walking past there.

A recommended dish for those looking for traditional Peranakan flavours is the Babi Assam ($18.90++), a slow-braised pork belly in a mildly spicy and tangy tamarind sauce.

While I still have fond memories of my grandma’s buah keluak (a type of black nut which requires days of preparation), Godmama’s version of Ayam Buah Keluak ($19.90) was actually quite decent.

There were three black nuts included, with the ‘flesh’ within soft and easy to dig out.

The chicken was stewed till fork-tender, with delicious aroma from the fresh root spices of lengkuas (blue ginger) and turmeric, complete with spicy and tangy flavours.

Loads of gravy, good to pair with some rice.

The Nyonya Chap Chye ($13.90) didn’t come with the typical sweet taste, but instead had an unusual base as the mixed vegetables, beancurd skin and mushrooms were braised in rich prawn bisque.

Might need some time getting used to the seafood savour. The purists may frown about the new take, while I was fine and grew to enjoy it after a few spoonfuls.

The Godmama Nasi Ulam ($8.90) was a herb rice dish served with 8 types of Peranakan classic herbs and spices include mackerel strips.

It looked better (great for Instagram) than what it tasted though, as I wished there was more fragrance in the rice and mix somehow.

If you do visit on a weekend, get some of the brunch items.

They include the Babi Assam Baked Eggs ($17.90), Ayam Buah Keluak Burger ($21.90), Durian Pengat Buttermilk Pancakes ($18.90), and Otak Otak Benedict ($19.90) – a patty topped with poached eggs on a slice of sourdough bread.

Compared to some modern Peranakan restaurants which can be overly fanciful or steep in price, I thought Godmama managed to present comforting food without losing too much of tradition, matched with friendly service.

Godmama
Funan, #04-07, 107 North Bridge Road, Singapore 179097
Opening Hours: Lunch 11am – 3:30pm, Dinner 6pm – 10pm (Mon – Fri)
Brunch 10:30am – 4pm, Dinner 6pm – 10pm (Sat – Sun)

Other Related Entries
Candlenut (Dempsey)
Tingkat PeraMakan (Owen Road)
True Blue Cuisine (Armenian Street)
Indigo Blue Kitchen (Shaw Centre)
The Blue Ginger (Great World)

* Follow @DanielFoodDiary on Facebook, Instagram and Youtube for more food news, food videos and travel highlights. DFD paid for food reviewed unless otherwise stated.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here